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MONTREAL, Nov. 26, 2014 /CNW Telbec/ - Michael Rousseau, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, will present at the Credit Suisse 2014 Global Industrials Conference on Tuesday, December 2, 2014
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Gatineau, Quebec, 24 November 2014 – Following a catastrophic failure on one of the cargo handling cranes aboard the bulk carrier Seapace in Bécancour, Quebec, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) today issued a warning to vessel owners.

On 13 August 2014, the bulk carrier Seapace sustained a failure of its cargo crane #4. The slewing ring bearing broke apart and the complete cabin and jib assemblies collapsed into a cargo hold, injuring the crane operator. The TSB is participating in the investigation of the occurrence with Transport Malta’s Marine Safety Investigation Unit.

There is a possibility that the same progressive failure of a slewing ring bearing will occur on any vessel fitted with similar cargo handling cranes. While the TSB has asked the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS) to share information about the safety risks, there is no known central database of such vessel owners. The TSB is therefore communicating this message to help reach vessel owners.

The bulk carrier is one of a series of 443 sister ships that were constructed between 2008 and 2014, by various shipyards located in China. The cargo handling crane was built for Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI) of Japan, under licence by Wuhan Marine Machinery Plant Co. Ltd. (WMMP) of China. It was an electro-hydraulic jib crane of the slim type SS36T (serial number DC09-11102-4). The slewing ring bearing assembly was fabricated by Dalian Metallurgical Bearing Co. Ltd. of China under the standard JB/T2300 of the type 133.34.2300.00.03 (2-row roller slewing ring bearing with internal gear, serial number D00984). For pictures of the occurrence, visit our Flickr page.

Vessel owners should take whatever measures considered appropriate to ensure the integrity of any similar unit in service on board vessels. The TSB would appreciate being advised of any measures implemented either by phone at 1-800-387-3557 or by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Published in Transportation Safety Board of Canada
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Ottawa, Ontario, 24 November 2014 - The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) will hold a news conference to release its 2014 Watchlist. The Watchlist contains the issues that the TSB considers to be the biggest risk to Canada’s transportation system.

When:

26 November 2014 at 1:30 pm. Eastern Savings Time

Where:

Lady Elgin Room
Lord Elgin Hotel
100 Elgin Street, Ottawa, Ontario

Who:

Kathy Fox, Chair
Faye Ackermans, Member of the Board
John Clarkson, Member of the Board
Joseph Hincke, Member of the Board

This event is for media only. Media representatives will need to show their outlet identification.


The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

For more information or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Media Relations
819-994-8053

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Vancouver, British Colombia, 21 November 2014 – In its investigation report (M14P0023) released today on the February 2014 loss of propulsion of a tug on the South Arm Fraser River in British Columbia, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) highlighted the need to follow manufacturer’s recommendations for engine maintenance.

On 11 February 2014, the tug Jose Narvaez sustained a loss of propulsion due to a main engine seizure while towing an empty barge down the South Arm Fraser River in British Columbia. The tug and barge were towed back to the dock and secured. The main engine was deemed a constructive loss. There were no injuries or pollution.

The investigation determined that the lubricating oil was contaminated with combustion, freshwater, and/or anti-freeze, because the system had never been completely flushed out and cleaned after past major engine failures—even though this was recommended by the manufacturer. Investigators also found that the oil cooler was not maintained as per the manufacturer's recommendations, and it developed internal leaks that further contaminated the oil system, ultimately resulting in a loss in oil pressure. Furthermore, the loss of lubrication and piston cooling caused by the contaminated oil caused the engine cylinders to overheat. This further exacerbated the overheating of the rest of the engine and eventually led to its seizure and loss of propulsion.

Following the occurrence, Lafarge, the owner/operator of the tug, initiated weekly meetings to review safety procedures, drills, and preventive maintenance at the beginning of a shift. They also replaced the main engine and the cooling system on the Jose Narvaez, including upgrades to the monitoring system and alarm panel.

Published in Transportation Safety Board of Canada
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787 Dreamliners featuring carrier's new international cabin features to fly from Vancouver to Beijing, Seoul, Shanghai and Tokyo-Narita VANCOUVER, Nov. 19, 2014 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada today announced it will
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Air Canada Invites Media for an Up-Close Look at its New Dreamliner Boeing 787 now operating flights from YVR-Shanghai with more routes to come features fully redesigned interior VANCOUVER, Nov. 18,
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MONTREAL, Nov. 18, 2014 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada is asking Canadians to help select the winner of the Air Canada Athlete of the Year Award 2014. Starting today, voters can
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Air Canada Invites Media for an Up-Close Look at its New Dreamliner Boeing 787 now operating flights from YVR-Shanghai with more routes to come features fully redesigned interior VANCOUVER, Nov. 18,
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Gatineau, Quebec, 14 November 2014 - The Transportation Safety Board of Canada is launching a campaign to raise awareness about its SECURITAS program. The Canadian public and transportation industry employees are encouraged to confidentially report unsafe transportation acts and conditions through SECURITAS. While employees are urged to use existing internal company-specific safety reporting systems, not all transportation companies have such systems and some employees may not feel comfortable using them. SECURITAS offers an additional way for people to share safety concerns in the aviation, marine, railway and pipeline industries which the employee or public believes is not being addressed or when they believe there is no other recourse.

When the TSB receives a confidential report, investigators analyze the information and determine the appropriate action to be taken. The TSB may forward the information, often with its suggestion for corrective action, to the appropriate regulatory authority. Sometimes the TSB can contact specific transportation organizations, companies and/or agencies directly if they are the ones best placed to correct the problem. In other cases, the TSB may choose to launch its own investigation. However, the TSB will not take any action that might reveal the reporter's identity. The identity of the person making the report always remains confidential.

The TSB SECURITAS program provides industry insiders and the public with a way to report possible safety concerns and to help make Canada's transportation system safer. You can access the program by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., fax or telephone. The SECURITAS web page has more information on the program and on how to make a confidential report.

Published in Transportation Safety Board of Canada
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Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, 13 November 2014 – In its investigation report (M13M0102) into a fatal accident involving the fishing vessel Marie J released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) concluded that a wide turn close to a sandbar, and successive breaking waves contributed to the grounding and sinking of the vessel. The three people onboard drowned.

On 18 May 2013, the small lobster fishing vessel grounded on a sandbar in bad weather while returning to McEachern's Point Harbour in Tabusintac Bay, New Brunswick. The investigation found that the vessel made a wide turn around the first red buoy at the beginning of the channel, positioning the vessel close to the sandbar. Two successive breaking waves struck the vessel, set it to port and caused it to ground on the sandbar. The waves continued to strike the vessel, pushing it over the sandbar where it sank.

The TSB also determined that two other contributing factors to the grounding were that both the accuracy of the locations of the buoys and the position of the sandbar could not be determined because the tidal gully was prone to silting and bottom shifting.

Since the occurrence, the Canadian Coast Guard reviewed buoy placement in the channel, and five green port hand buoys were added to the channel. For its part, Fisheries and Oceans Canada commissioned a study to assess alternative strategies for improving navigational safety to access McEachern's Point Harbour at Tabusintac Bay. The study identified multiple options and found future environmental changes may cause additional breaches in the sandbars, decreasing tidal flow and increasing sedimentation.

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