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MONTREAL, Jan. 23, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada has launched its new, completely re-designed website www.aircanada.com which now offers a simple, intuitive user experience that is fully accessible across
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Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, 19 January 2017 – Drawing attention to the wide range of safety risks that persist in the fishing industry, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) today released its investigation report (M15A0348) into the November 2015 person overboard fatality near Clark’s Harbour, Nova Scotia.

On 30 November 2015, the opening day of lobster season, at about 0600 Atlantic Standard Time, the fishing vessel Cock-a-Wit Lady departed Shag Harbour, Nova Scotia, with five crew members on board. At 0911, the vessel reported that a deckhand had gone overboard while setting a first string of lobster traps. The crew recovered the deckhand and attempted resuscitation. After being airlifted to hospital, the crew member was pronounced deceased.

The investigation determined that while the crew was setting lobster traps, one of the traps got caught on the port guard rail. A deckhand attempted to free the caught trap with his feet, and while doing so, he stepped into the coils of rope attached to the traps. When he managed to free the trap, it quickly went over the stern, and the deckhand was hauled overboard and carried under water by the weight and momentum of the traps. The vessel's overhead block, which is mounted on top of the wheelhouse and used in conjunction with the trap hauler to pull traps aboard, was in stowed position as the crew was not planning on using it that day. In an attempt to save time, the crew tried to recover the deckhand using only the trap hauler but, given the angle of the line and additional strain of the submerged traps, the line parted. The crew then lowered the overhead block and was able to recover the deckhand. By that time, approximately 10 minutes had passed and the crew was unable to resuscitate the deckhand.

The investigation identified a number of risks related to emergency preparedness. These risks were also identified in a TSB Safety Issues Investigation (SII) into fishing safety that was published in 2012. If fishing vessel operations do not have a system for on-board risk management, such as safety meetings, there is a risk that crew members may not effectively mitigate on-board hazards. Furthermore, if vessel operators do not conduct drills that provide an opportunity for the crew to identify shortcomings in emergency response situations, such as a person overboard, there is a risk that fishermen will not be able to respond to an emergency effectively.

Commercial fishing safety is a TSB Watchlist issue as it is recognized nationwide that the loss of life on fishing vessels is simply too great. Although regulations have been published and will likely lower some of the risks associated with outstanding safety deficiencies, gaps remain with respect to, among other things, unsafe operating practices and crew training.

See the investigation page for more information.

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Winnipeg, Manitoba, 17 January 2017 – In its investigation report (A15C0130) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) found that deteriorating weather and departure under conditions of near darkness led to the fatal September 2015 crash of a Robinson R44 helicopter near Foleyet, Ontario.

On 8 September 2015, at approximately 2015 Eastern Daylight Time, an Apex Helicopters Inc. Robinson R44 departed a camp on Horwood Lake, Ontario, for the Foleyet Timber Camp with one pilot and one passenger on board. Sometime after liftoff, northwest of the Foleyet Timber Camp, the helicopter struck trees on elevated terrain and was destroyed by impact forces. There was no post-impact fire, and the occupants sustained fatal injuries.

The investigation determined that the flight was conducted in deteriorating weather and departed under conditions of near darkness. The helicopter was not equipped for flying at night or in instrument conditions, and the pilot was not certified for conducting such operations. It is likely that the pilot was unable to determine the helicopter’s height above the forest canopy and to notice the rising terrain ahead before striking trees. Because a number of hazards are associated with night flights, the TSB issued Recommendation A16-08, calling for regulations to clearly define the visual references required to reduce the risks associated with flying at night.

The helicopter was equipped with an emergency locator transmitter (ELT) that activated upon impact; however, it did not transmit its position because the antenna had broken off during the accident. The aircraft was not reported missing until the following day at approximately 1500, which resulted in search and rescue operations being delayed by approximately 20 hours. In 2016, the TSB issued four safety recommendations (A16‑02, A16‑03, A16‑04, and A16‑05) related to ELT crash survivability. If existing ELT design and certification standards do not ensure that the currently manufactured systems provide a reasonable degree of survivability from fire or impact forces, there is a risk that potentially life-saving search-and-rescue services may be delayed.

The investigation also found that the helicopter was not equipped with a flight data recorder or a cockpit voice recorder, nor was either required by regulation. In 2013, the TSB issued Recommendation A13-01, pushing for the installation of lightweight flight recording systems by all commercial operators. This occurrence demonstrates once more that if cockpit and flight data recordings are not available to an investigation, this may preclude the identification and communication of safety deficiencies to advance transportation safety.

Following the accident, Apex Helicopters Inc. has reviewed and emphasized the importance of timely reporting of overdue aircraft with all newly hired pilots and ground crew.

See the investigation page for more information.

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MONTREAL, Jan. 10, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Michael Rousseau, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, will present at the AltaCorp Capital 5th Annual Institutional Investor Conference on Thursday, January 12,
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Richmond Hill, Ontario, 10 January 2017 – In the release of its investigation report (A14O0218) today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) determined that flight crew deviation from standard landing procedures led to the October 2014 risk of a runway excursion, and that the aircraft was not stabilized during a portion of the approach phase.

On 3 October 2014, the Bombardier DHC-8-400, operating as Sky Regional Airlines flight 7519, departed Montréal/Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport, Quebec, for a regularly scheduled flight to Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport, Ontario. During the landing, the aircraft touched down approximately 800 feet from the threshold of runway 26 but did not slow down in a timely manner. As the aircraft approached the end of the runway, the flight crew steered the aircraft toward the last taxiway to prevent an overrun. The aircraft came to a stop on the taxiway, shortly after exiting the runway. There were no injuries and no damage to the aircraft.

During the landing roll, likely in an attempt to make a smooth landing, the flight crew did not adhere to standard landing technique, and only light braking was initially applied, leading to the risk of overrun. It was also determined that during a portion of the approach phase, the aircraft did not meet stabilized approach criteria as a result of being well above the desired approach path. The investigation also highlights deficiencies in training for flight crews in recognizing unstable approaches, as well as the lack of mandatory company reporting of unstable approaches, as risk factors.

Unstable approaches are one of the key safety issues on the 2016 TSB Watchlist. When continued to a landing, unstable approaches are known to increase the likelihood of a landing accident. There is also an outstanding Board recommendation (A14-01) calling for Transport Canada to require airlines to monitor and reduce unstable approaches that continue to a landing.

Following this occurrence, Sky Regional Airlines conducted an internal Safety Management System (SMS) investigation. It identified and took steps to mitigate the risks associated with portions of its flight operations. This included updating initial and recurrent training of landing procedures and equipping its DHC-8-400 fleet with enhanced quick access flight recorders for accurate flight data analysis.

See the investigation page for more information.

Published in Transportation Safety Board of Canada
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Richmond Hill, Ontario, 9 January 2017 – In its investigation report (A14F0065) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) determined that an unstable approach led to the 10 May 2014 hard landing of an Air Canada Rouge Airbus 319 at the Sangster International Airport in Montego Bay, Jamaica. There were no injuries and no structural damage to the aircraft.

The Air Canada Rouge Airbus A319 was operating as flight AC1804 from Toronto, Ontario, to Montego Bay, Jamaica, with 131 passengers and 6 crew members on board. At approximately 14 minutes before touchdown, the aircraft was cleared for a non-precision approach to Runway 07 at the Montego Bay airport. The approach became unstable and the aircraft touched down hard. The landing subjected the main landing gear to very high loading. The aircraft was subsequently inspected and the main landing gear shock absorbers were replaced as a precaution.

The investigation determined that the approach became unstable as a result of inconsistent airspeed management and delayed configuration of the aircraft for landing. The flight crew did not adhere to standard operating procedures, which required the monitoring of all available parameters during approach and landing.  The investigation also found that simulator training to recognize an unstable approach leading to a missed approach had not been provided. As such, the flight crew did not recognize the instability of the approach and continued it well beyond the point at which a missed approach and go-around should have been initiated.

If flight crews do not follow standard procedures and best practices that facilitate the monitoring of stabilized approach criteria and excessive parameter deviations, there is a risk that undesired aircraft states will be mismanaged. Unstable approaches are one of the key safety issues on the 2016 TSB Watchlist. There is also an outstanding Board recommendation (A14-01) calling for Transport Canada to require airlines to monitor and reduce unstable approaches that continue to a landing.

Following the occurrence, Air Canada Rouge refined its stable-approach policy, modified its training to include more manual flying scenarios and incorporated simulator training for unstable approaches leading to a missed approach.

See the investigation page for more information.

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MONTREAL, Jan. 3, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada provided a review of 2016 highlights as it prepares to celebrate its 80th anniversary year in 2017. "We had a highly satisfying year
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MONTREAL, Dec. 22, 2016 /CNW Telbec/ - Cathay Pacific and Air Canada today announced they have finalized a strategic cooperation agreement that will enhance travel services for Cathay Pacific customers when
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MONTREAL, Dec. 22, 2016 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada is offering customers an opportunity to give the gift of travel to someone deserving this holiday season. https://www.facebook.com/aircanada/videos/1285491851498707/ Yesterday
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New seasonal service to be operated by Air Canada Rouge MONTREAL, Dec. 22, 2016 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada today inaugurated new twice-weekly flights between Montreal and Costa Rica. This morning's departure
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