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]]>MONTREAL, Aug. 15, 2014 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada today launched an enhanced Preferred Seats program that offers customers the choice of more seats with additional legroom aboard its North American flights
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]]>MONTREAL, Aug. 12, 2014 /CNW Telbec/ - This year's Air Canada Foundation golf tournament raised a record of over $1,000,000 in support of organizations focused on health and wellbeing of children in
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Low speed, high descent rate led to September 2012 hard landing and aircraft damage of Jazz Aviation flight in Gaspé, Quebec

Dorval, Quebec, 7 August 2014 – In its investigation report (A12Q0161) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) determined that a landing approach below the optimum approach slope at a low speed and high descent rate led to the hard landing and fuselage strike of a de Havilland DHC-8-301 at the Gaspé Airport on 10 September 2012. There were no injuries to the 32 passengers and 3 crew members, but the aircraft sustained significant damage to its rear fuselage.

The Jazz Aviation DHC-8 was on a scheduled flight from Iles-de-la-Madelaine, Quebec to Gaspé, Quebec. While on its final approach to land, the aircraft reached the optimum descent angle of 3 degrees and continued its approach, descending gradually below the slope indicated by the runway’s precision approach path indicator (PAPI) lights. At 170 feet above the runway threshold, the aircraft descended below the lower limit of the PAPI light descent slope and the pilot flying reduced power, thus reducing speed and increasing the descent rate. This indicated an intention to touch down near the runway threshold. At 45 feet above the runway threshold, the pilot reduced power to idle, further increasing the descent rate and reducing airspeed. The nose was raised just prior to touchdown, and the aircraft landed hard resulting in the lower part of the aft fuselage contacted the runway surface during the landing.

The investigation found that the pilot monitoring did not realize that the aircraft was flying too slowly in time to intervene and prevent the hard landing. An attempt to reduce the rate of descent by applying an abrupt nose-up attitude was ineffective, as the aircraft was already flying too slowly. The aft part of the fuselage striking the runway caused significant structural damage to the aircraft.‎ ‎Furthermore, the crew had not received training on the manufacturer’s recommended technique to reduce descent rates close to the ground (increasing engine power and limiting nose-up attitude).

Following the occurrence, Jazz Aviation now provides training on recovery from high descent rates close to the ground to all DHC-8 pilots, and has made improvements to its operating procedures, including amending its short-field landing technique and clarifying stabilized approach and landing criteria.

Published in Transportation Safety Board of Canada
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]]>Adjusted net income increased 21 per cent to $139 million MONTREAL, Aug. 7, 2014 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada today reported second quarter adjusted net income (1) of $139 million or $0.47
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]]>Traffic increased 12.7 per cent on capacity increase of 11.4 per cent MONTREAL, Aug. 6, 2014 /CNW Telbec/ - For the month of July, Air Canada reported a record system load factor
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Several factors led to a risk of collision for an aircraft landing at Toronto's Lester B. Pearson Airport in March 2013

Toronto, Ontario, 30 July 2014 – In its investigation report (A13O0045) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) determined that a number of factors contributed to an unattended maintenance van crossing the active runway while an aircraft was landing at the Toronto/Lester B. Pearson International Airport on 11 March 2013. There were no injuries.

A Sunwing Airlines aircraft maintenance technician was in a van parked near the nose of one of the company’s aircraft. The technician exited the van to perform various duties outside the aircraft and then boarded it to check the cockpit. Meanwhile, the van had rolled to and crossed the active arrival runway as an aircraft prepared to land. Air traffic control noticed a ground radar target as the driverless van crossed the runway, and instructed the Air Canada Embraer 190 to pull up and go around. Despite two calls to go around, the Air Canada flight continued its approach, flew over the van at a height of approximately 35 feet and landed.

The investigation found that the van rolled across the active arrival runway because it was left unattended with the engine running and the drive gear engaged. The first air traffic control instruction to the Embraer’s flight crew to go around was masked by the sound of the ground proximity warning system in the cockpit, and therefore not heard by the flight crew. The second go-around instruction went unnoticed by the flight crew because it was truncated and the crew did not hear the aircraft call sign. Without supporting visual cues, the crew did not interpret the second call as applying to them.

Following the occurrence, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) issued directives to the Toronto Pearson aviation community reiterating the prohibition against leaving vehicles idling and unsecured on the airside. The GTAA also published and disseminated information on the luminosity requirements for vehicle roof beacons and did spot checks to inspect beacons and require inoperative or inadequate beacons to be repaired or replaced. Sunwing Airlines reported to Transport Canada that it has inspected all of its airside vehicles and ensured that their roof beacons meet specified luminosity standards.

Risk of collisions on runways is a TSB Watchlist issue. Watch the video!

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]]>VANCOUVER, July 23, 2014 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada announced today that it will introduce a new seasonal non-stop service operated by Air Canada rouge between Vancouver and Palm Springs, California this
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Statement by Wendy A. Tadros, Chair, Transportation Safety Board of Canada, on the anniversary of the Lac-Mégantic train accident

Gatineau, Quebec, 4 July 2014 – As we approach the first anniversary of the most devastating train accident in Canadian history, I assure the people of Lac-Mégantic, and all Canadians, that the ongoing investigation into this tragedy remains our top priority.

Investigations are complex, and we take the time to conduct a thorough, science-based examination to find out what happened and why. We have a team of highly-skilled experts dedicated to this investigation, and we expect to release the TSB's report in the next few months. However, if crucial safety information needs to be communicated right away, we don't wait for the final report to be released. Throughout this investigation we issued 3 recommendations and 4 safety advisory letters which are all found on the active investigation page on the TSB website.

On this somber anniversary, I would like to say to the families who lost loved ones – you will soon have more answers, and we will continue advocating for the changes needed to ensure this never happens again.

Published in Transportation Safety Board of Canada
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Loss of situational awareness and control likely caused fatal 2013 Manitoba helicopter accident

Winnipeg, Manitoba, 17 July 2014 – In the release of its investigation report (A13C0073) today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada cited the loss of situational awareness and loss of control as the likely causes of a fatal helicopter crash at Gull Lake, Manitoba, in July of 2013.

At 4 pm Central Daylight Time, on 1 July 2013,  the Bell 206B helicopter, operated by Custom Helicopters Ltd., left Gillam Lake, Manitoba, for Gull Lake, to pick up a work crew. At 830 pm the helicopter was declared missing. A search ensued and debris was found the following morning along the shore line of Gull Lake. The pilot was fatally injured.

The examination of the small amount of wreckage that was recovered indicated that the helicopter had struck the water at high speed and was destroyed. The investigation concluded that the pilot likely flew into an area of lower visibility, due to either heavy smoke in the area or rain showers, or both. This likely contributed to a loss of situational awareness and would have reduced the pilot’s ability to maintain control of the helicopter. The helicopter descended and struck the water before the pilot was able to regain adequate visual reference.

The TSB cautions that if commercial helicopter pilots do not have basic instrument flying skills, there is an increased risk of a loss of situational awareness and control in situations where visual flight continues into poor meteorological conditions.

Custom Helicopters Ltd. has since incorporated additional standards into its operations that pilots shall meet prior to being dispatched to work in wildfire operations.

Published in Transportation Safety Board of Canada
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]]>MONTREAL, July 17, 2014 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada will hold a conference call for analysts on Thursday, August 7, 2014 to present 2014 second quarter results. Air Canada President and Chief
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