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MONTRÉAL, March 24, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - AirCanada (TSX: AC) (OTCQX: ACDVF) announced today that its Board of Directors has approved a shareholder rights plan to renew Air Canada's existing
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MONTRÉAL, March 22, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada today said it welcomes funding in the Federal Budget that will improve airport security screening processes at Canadian airports. This will benefit travellers
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MONTREAL, March 22, 2017 /CNW/ - Michael Rousseau, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, will present at the Desjardins Industrials, Telecom & Consumer Conference on Monday, March 27, 2017 at
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Winnipeg, Manitoba, 21 March 2017 – The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) found that inadequate securement and insufficient employee supervision led to the March 2016 uncontrolled movement of a tank car in Regina, Saskatchewan. The results of the investigation are detailed in the report (R16W0059) released today.

On 1 March 2016, while a Cando Rail Services assignment was switching tank cars loaded with asphalt at the Co-op refinery in Regina, one of the tank cars rolled away uncontrolled. The tank car, which travelled about 2.7 miles (4.3 kilometres) before coming to rest, reached a speed of 19 mph and traversed seven public crossings and a railway interlocking that crossed the Canadian Pacific Railway Lanigan Subdivision. The grade crossing warning system at each of the seven crossings functioned as required, protecting the roadway traffic. There were no injuries nor dangerous goods involved.

The investigation determined that the incident occurred when the crew left the tank car unattended, secured only by emergency air brakes. These slowly lost pressure until they released, allowing the car to roll away. Hand brakes had not been applied to the unattended equipment, nor had crew members performed hand brake effectiveness tests, conducted a briefing with all crew members, or initiated an emergency radio broadcast when the tank car rolled away. Although the crew did attempt to catch the runaway car with their locomotive, they were unable to do so without violating the restrictions of their operating limits.

The TSB's investigation revealed that routine adaptations to rules and procedures by employees went undetected by the company prior to the incident. If adaptations are made to operating rules and procedures, safety margins built into the rules are often reduced, increasing the risk of unsafe operations and accidents.

Most uncontrolled railway movements in Canada are directly related to securement issues. Following the 2013 Lac-Mégantic accident, the TSB recommended that Transport Canada (TC) require Canadian railways to put additional physical defences in place to prevent runaway equipment (TSB Recommendation R14-04). Although TC revised the rules regarding train securement, the report indicates that the number of runaway equipment occurrences due to inadequate train securement had increased, from 21 in 2014 to 33 in 2015. There were 27 in 2016.

Following this occurrence, Cando Rail Services took a number of measures to increase the safety of its operations. This included issuing a system-wide bulletin requiring that all equipment have the minimum number of hand brakes applied, even if attended by an employee.

See the investigation page for more information.

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MONTREAL, March 15, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada announced today the return of daily year-round service between Montreal and Washington Dulles (IAD) starting May 1, 2017, offering more choice for
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VANCOUVER, March 15, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada announced today the introduction of daily summer seasonal service between Vancouver and Boston starting June 23, 2017 until September 4, 2017. Special
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Richmond Hill, Ontario, 9 March 2017 – In its investigation report (A15O0015) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) determined that the continuation of an unstable approach following a loss of visual reference led to a Jazz Aviation LP aircraft contacting the surface short of the runway at the Sault Ste. Marie Airport, Ontario, in February 2015. There were no injuries, but there was significant damage to the aircraft.

On 24 February 2015, a de Havilland DHC-8-102, operating as Jazz Aviation LP flight JZA7795 and carrying 15 passengers, departed Toronto/Lester B. Pearson International Airport, Ontario, for a scheduled flight to Sault Ste. Marie Airport, Ontario. While on approach to Runway 30, in conditions of twilight and reduced visibility due to blowing snow, the aircraft touched down approximately 450 feet prior to the runway threshold. Following touchdown, the aircraft struck and damaged a runway approach light before coming to a stop approximately 1500 feet past the threshold.

The investigation determined that a significant power reduction and subsequent decrease in airspeed, while flying below the minimum stabilization height of 500 feet, resulted in an unstable approach. This rapid deceleration steepened the aircraft's vertical path. The crew had reduced power in order to reach the target airspeed for the final approach and landing.

The crew had followed what they understood to be the correct speeds for the approach according to the company's guidance material. Due to ambiguity in the guidance and uncertainty as to the required speed during the approach, the flight crew did not recognize that the approach was unstable and continued the approach to a landing.

The investigation also found that the rapidly changing weather decreased the flight crew's visibility of the runway, and that the steepened vertical profile created as a result of the power reduction went unnoticed, and uncorrected. Although the loss of visual reference required a go-around, the flight crew continued the approach.

An examination of over 500 similar flights on Jazz DHC-8-102s showed that company aircraft routinely fly decelerating approaches below the minimum stabilization height of 500 feet. If approaches that require excessive deceleration below established stabilization heights are routinely flown, then there is a continued risk of an approach or landing accident.

Unstable approaches are one of the key safety issues on the 2016 TSB Watchlist. There is also an outstanding Board recommendation (A14-01) calling for Transport Canada to require commercial air services to monitor and reduce unstable approaches that continue to a landing.

Following the occurrence, Jazz Aviation LP undertook a number of safety actions such as making amendments to the Jazz DASH 8 Aircraft Operating Manual, by introducing significant changes to the "Stabilized Approach Factors" subsection and adding simulator scenarios to the training syllabus.

See the investigation page for more information.

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AC868 Toronto-London Heathrow, AC165 Montreal-Calgary and AC548 Vancouver-Newark/New York operated by all-female crews todayFlights given clearance and instructions by female Nav Canada Air Traffic Controllers TORONTO and MONTREAL and VANCOUVER, March 8, 2017
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Gatineau, Quebec, 8 March 2017 – Citing poor track conditions and inadequate drainage as important factors, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) today released its investigation report (R15H0092) into the Huron Central Railway (HCRY) train derailment in 2015 near Spanish, Ontario.

On 1 November 2015, at approximately 2250 Eastern Standard Time, an HCRY freight train was proceeding westward on the Webbwood Subdivision at 25 mph when a train-initiated emergency brake application occurred at Mile 72.08, near Spanish, Ontario. Two separate groups of equipment derailed destroying about 225 feet of roadbed. No dangerous goods were involved and there were no injuries.

The investigation determined that the first group, three locomotives and the first eight cars of the train, derailed when the roadbed collapsed and the north rail joint broke apart under the train. The second group, five empty cars near the middle of the train, derailed due to compressive in-train forces when the cars impacted one another as the train rapidly decelerated during the derailment. The investigation also determined that HCRY's track inspection and maintenance program was not effective in dealing with various track infrastructure issues such as drainage, track instability, and rail joint defects. In this occurrence, a blocked culvert had resulted in inadequate drainage over several days of rain, allowing water to pool, migrate through the railway embankment and saturate the subgrade. If track inspectors are not provided with appropriate training on precursor ground hazards such as inadequate drainage, unstable ground conditions may not be detected in a timely manner, increasing the risk of derailment due to track conditions. Furthermore, a large number of rail joint defects were allowed to remain in service without performing the necessary follow up inspections regularly.

Following the occurrence, slow orders were issued for any identified track defects on the Webbwood Subdivision and the defects were repaired. The slow orders were removed only after repairs were completed and inspected by a supervisor.

As HRCY is a provincially regulated railway, the TSB investigation was conducted in accordance with a Memorandum of Understanding with the Province of Ontario.

See the investigation page for more information.

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MONTREAL, March 3, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Michael Rousseau, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Air Canada will make a presentation the CIBC Industrials Conference in Toronto on Thursday,
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