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As Canadians celebrate from coast to coast on July 1, 2015, Air Canada's leisure carrier marks two years of operations TORONTO, July 1, 2015 /CNW/ - Today Air Canada rouge welcomes customers
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News Article / June 30, 2015

From RCAF Public Affairs

Canada celebrates 148 years as a nation on July 1, 2015. The airmen and airwomen of the Royal Canadian Air Force

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News Article / June 30, 2015

By Joanna Calder

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) welcomed its new RCAF chief warrant officer, Chief Warrant Officer Gérard Poitras, at a ceremony held

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Richmond Hill, Ontario, 30 June 2015 – The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) today released its investigation report (A14O0077) into the loss of control and subsequent collision with water and fatality involving a Cessna 185E at Taylor Lake, Ontario.

On 24 May 2014, a privately-registered Cessna 185E, equipped with amphibious floats, departed the Guelph Airpark for a flight to Taylor Lake, Ontario. The pilot was the sole occupant of the aircraft. While conducting a glassy-water landing, the pilot lost control and the aircraft cartwheeled and sank. The aircraft fuselage was damaged by impact forces and the pilot’s door could not be opened. The pilot survived the impact but was not able to escape the submerged aircraft before drowning.

The investigation found that the right float contacted the water first, dug in, and resulted in a loss of control and the aircraft cartwheeling. With respect to contributing factors, the investigation determined that the number of hours the pilot had flown in recent years had decreased, and the pilot was likely less proficient than in earlier years. This would make the glassy-water landing more difficult. Glassy-water conditions are considered to present the most difficulty for landing a seaplane, regardless of experience. The mirror effect created by glassy-water conditions affects depth perception making it difficult for pilots to determine the aircraft’s height above the water.

The investigation also found that the pilot did not have emergency egress training. Although not required by regulation, egress training has been shown to improve the chances of exiting a submerged aircraft following a survivable accident.

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Winnipeg, Manitoba, 29 June 2015 – In its investigation (A12Q0216) into the Perimeter Aviation Flight 993 that crashed while landing in Sanikiluaq, Nunavut, on December 22, 2012, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) determined that the aircraft came in too high, too steep, and too fast, striking the ground 525 feet past the end of the runway after an unsuccessful attempt to reject the landing. The 2 crew and 6 adult passengers, secured by their seatbelts, suffered injuries ranging from minor to serious. A lap-held infant, not restrained by any device or seatbelt, was fatally injured.

"Every day, families board commercial aircraft with babies and young children, and the majority trust that, if something goes wrong, a parent's arms can restrain their child safely,” said Kathy Fox, Chair of the TSB. “In the case of severe turbulence, a sudden deceleration, or a crash such as this one, research has proven that adults are not strong enough to adequately restrain a lap-held infant just by holding on to them. And just like in cars, adult lap belts are not suitable to restrain young children. This accident saw an infant ripped from his mother's arms and killed in the subsequent impact, even though everyone else survived.”

In its report released today, the Board is issuing two recommendations aimed at making air travel safer for infants and children. First, it is recommending that Transport Canada require commercial air carriers to collect data, and report on a routine basis, the number of infants and young children travelling. Currently, these statistics are not available, and better data is required to conduct research, assess risks, and outline emerging trends related to the carriage of infants and children.

Second, the Board is recommending that Transport Canada work with industry to develop age and size appropriate child restraint systems for infants and young children travelling on commercial aircraft and mandate their use to provide an equivalent level of safety compared to adults.

“This investigation identified issues associated with pre-flight planning, crew communication and unstable approaches—but what stands out most was the tragic fate of the baby on this aircraft,” added Fox. “We think infants and children deserve an equivalent level of safety as adults on board aircraft, and that is why we are calling on Transport Canada and the aviation industry to take action. It's time to do right by our children.”

Approach-and-landing accidents are on the TSB Watchlist. The TSB continues to call on Transport Canada and operators to do more to reduce the number of unstable approaches that are continued to a landing.

See investigation page for more information.

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ABBOTSFORD, BC, June 27, 2015 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada rouge flight AC1979 touched down at the Abbotsford International Airport this morning, marking the start of new non-stop seasonal service from Toronto's
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News Article / June 26, 2015 / Project number: 2015-4

Lieutenant Mathew Strong, 2015 CF-18 Hornet Demonstration Team Public Affairs Officer

The weekend of June 20-21, saw the CF-18 Hornet Demonstration

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MONTREAL, June 25, 2015 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada welcomes today's confirmation by Unifor, representing the airline's approximately 4,000 Customer Service and Sales Agents, that its members have ratified an agreement
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Winnipeg, Manitoba, 25 June 2015 – The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) will hold a news conference on 29 June 2015, to make public its report (A12Q0216) on the investigation into the Perimeter Aviation aircraft that crashed on 22 December 2012 in Sanikiluaq, Nunavut.

When:
29 June 2015
1:30 p.m. Central Daylight Time
Who:
Kathy Fox, TSB Chair
Gayle Conners, Investigator-in-charge
Missy Rudin-Brown, Senior Human Factors Investigator
Where:
Holiday Inn Winnipeg International Airport Hotel by Polo Park
1740 Ellice Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba

This event is for media only. Media representatives will need to show their outlet identification.

The news conference will be webcast live from Winnipeg. You can view the webcast at the following address http://www.ustream.tv/channel/transportation-safety-board-of-canada.


The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

For more information, contact:
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Media Relations
Telephone: 819-994-8053
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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News Article / June 25, 2015

By Sergeant Joel Green

In the early morning of May 3, 2015, Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) rock band Spitfire Kings arrived on the flight

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