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Québec, Quebec, 3 June 2019 – Today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) welcomes the heads of independent safety investigation authorities from International Transportation Safety Association (ITSA) member countries to Québec City for the ITSA annual conference, which is taking place from 3 to 6 June 2019.

“As a leader in transportation safety investigations and founding member, the TSB is delighted to receive fellow ITSA members' representatives,” said Kathy Fox, Chair of the TSB. “We firmly believe in ITSA's mission, which relies on information sharing and cooperation to promote independent, non-judicial investigations of transportation accidents and thereby contribute to the safety of the public and industry.”

ITSA is a collaborative network of heads of 16 independent national safety investigation authorities, which seeks, among other things, to share best practices and learn from the experiences of others. The topics addressed during the conference may include safety deficiencies, safety studies, safety recommendations, investigation techniques, and training and recruiting strategies for investigators. The conference also provides an opportunity for members to identify common concerns, challenges, methods and solutions, and provides a platform for open, frank discussions among members on strategic issues and concerns.

For more information about ITSA and its members, please visit the ITSA website


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Gatineau Quebec, 29 June 2019 - The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) and the United States National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) have deployed teams of investigators to the site of yesterday's Canadian National Railway (CN) train derailment in the St. Clair Tunnel which spans the Canada – US border.

Investigators from both agencies are working to determine the point of derailment. If the point of derailment is in Canada, the TSB will become the lead agency for the accident investigation.

Access to the site is restricted due to the limited space available and the potential hazards in the tunnel. We must ensure that the site is safe for investigators and those working to clear the accident site.

Once further information about the occurrence is available, both agencies will provide an update.


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Gatineau Quebec, 05 July 2019 - Today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) announced that it will be conducting the accident investigation into the June 28 Canadian National Railway (CN) train derailment that occurred in the St. Clair Tunnel between Sarnia, Ontario, and Port Huron, Michigan.

Following an initial assessment of the accident by both the TSB and the US National Transportation Safety Board, it was determined that the derailment was initiated in Canada.

The TSB would like to acknowledge the coordinated efforts of emergency response personnel, and the collaboration between multiple agencies from both sides of the border.


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Edmonton, Alberta, 9 July 2019 — Today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) released its investigation report (R18E0138) on the main-track derailment that occurred in Landis, Saskatchewan, in September 2018.

The TSB conducted a limited-scope, fact-gathering investigation into this occurrence to advance transportation safety through greater awareness of potential safety issues.

See the investigation page for further information.


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Dorval, Quebec, 10 July 2019 – In its investigation report (A18Q0069) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) found that short staffing and a deviation from standard procedures by air traffic controllers led to a May 2018 loss of separation between an Air Transat Airbus A310 and a Cessna 421 light twin-engine aircraft near the Montreal/Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport.

On 16 May 2018, both aircraft were inbound to land at the Montreal/Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport. The Airbus was coming from the west and was to fly north of the airport and land on Runway 24R, while the Cessna was inbound from the northeast and was to land on Runway 24L. A loss of separation between the two aircraft occurred when both aircraft were approximately 18 nautical miles northeast of the airport. At the closest point, the two aircraft came within 500 feet vertically and 1.7 nautical miles laterally of each other. Normally the aircraft should be separated by at least 1000 feet vertically or 3 nautical miles laterally.

Although seven controllers and a shift supervisor would have normally been scheduled to work that evening, absences and illness reduced that number to three controllers and a supervisor. As a result, six sectors of airspace normally divided among the controllers needed to be combined and controlled by just three—which in turn increased each of their areas of responsibility, as well as their workload and its complexity.

The TSB's investigation also found that, with the Cessna approaching from a sector to the northeast, control responsibility for it was not transferred to the next sector according to standard procedure. As a result, a controller-in-training responsible for the receiving sector, was not initially aware of the presence or intentions of the Cessna until it entered his airspace, and as a result did not have an opportunity to develop a plan to deal with the converging traffic. Also during this time, the instructor, who was both the shift supervisor and responsible for the trainee, was distracted by other tasks and wasn't able to accurately monitor the developing situation.

Shortly thereafter, the controller-in-training noticed the Cessna on the display and the required separation was re-established. Both aircraft then landed without incident.
The Board is not aware of any safety action taken following this investigation.

See the investigation page for more information.


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Richmond Hill, Ontario, 17 July 2019 — In its investigation report (R18T0006) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada found that a lack of training on safe working practices when clearing snow at railway crossings led to a fatal collision between a snowplow and a Canadian National Railway (CN) train at a crossing in London, Ontario.

On the morning of 9 January 2018, a CN freight train proceeding eastward struck a snowplow on the sidewalk at the Colborne Street public crossing. The lone snowplow operator was fatally injured.

The investigation found that the accident occurred when the snowplow travelled onto the railway crossing while clearing snow from the sidewalk. Although the warning devices—which included flashing lights, a bell, and gates—activated while the plow was in the crossing, the combination of the plow’s position, the restricted visibility inside the cab, and the background noise of the plow itself made it difficult to detect these warnings, or to hear the train’s horn. A lack of experience with railway crossings, a lack of training on safe working practices when clearing snow at railway crossings, and tunnel vision exacerbated by fatigue inhibited the effectiveness of the snowplow operator’s visual scanning. As such, the operator did not detect the oncoming train.

The investigation also found that, although the City of London provided training to its employees who operate snowplows, the contractor and subcontractor involved in this occurrence did not provide formal training to their employees on safe working practices when clearing snow at railway crossings. Oversight by the contractor and the City of London did not ensure that employees had the skills and knowledge to perform their duties safely. If snow-clearing contract companies do not have safe work procedures and related training in place for work at railway crossings, there is an increased risk of crossing accidents.

Following this occurrence, the City of London required snowplow operators employed by its sidewalk snow-clearing contractors to participate in a City-led review of safe operating practices at railway crossings. Guidance documents on clearing snow at crossings were distributed to snowplow operators at this review session.

See the TSB investigation page for further information.


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July 15, 2019 – Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador – Department of National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces

As outlined in Canada’s defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, the Government of

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July 8, 2019 – Bagotville, Quebec – National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces

Through Canada’s Defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, the Department of National Defence (DND) is reducing its carbon footprint

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This year, at the age of 96, Eugénie “Frankie” Turner will be at Juno Beach on June 6, 2019 along with fellow D-Day and the Battle of Normandy Veterans.

“When I
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June 4, 2019 – Ottawa – National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces

Minister of National Defence Harjit S. Sajjan and Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence Lawrence

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