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Gatineau, Quebec, 28 February 2013 — The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) today released its final air investigation report (A11O0031) into the 13 March 2011 return after take-off of a Sunwing Airlines flight at Toronto–Lester B. Pearson International Airport.

The Sunwing flight was bound for Cozumel, Mexico, with 189 passengers and a crew of 7. During the early morning take-off run, the aircraft's autothrottle disengaged because of the failure of the airspeed monitoring equipment. The pilot continued the take-off but encountered additional problems on the climb-out. The pilot then informed air traffic control that the aircraft would be returning to the airport. The aircraft returned and landed uneventfully. There were no injuries or damage to the aircraft.

The investigation determined that a failure in the pitot-static system, a system used to determine the aircraft's airspeed, resulted in inaccurate airspeed indications, stall warnings, and, for unknown reasons, misleading commands being displayed on the aircraft flight instruments. The investigation also found that the operator delayed reporting the incident to the TSB because it did not recognize this event as a reportable aviation occurrence. The delay meant that valuable information on the flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder was lost.

The faulty equipment was replaced and the aircraft was returned to service. Sunwing has updated its safety management system to include a review of TSB criteria for reportable accidents and incidents. This is intended to facilitate timely reporting of occurrences.


The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

For more information, contact:
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Media Relations
819-994-8053

Gatineau, Quebec, 15 February 2013 – The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is encouraged by responses to its 2012 recommendations arising from its investigation into an approach and landing accident at the Chicoutimi/St-Honoré Airport in Quebec. In that accident, the aircraft crashed short of the runway while conducting a non-precision approach, killing the two crew members (see Investigation Report A09Q0203).

"This tragedy only further highlights the need for critical improvements, and we're pleased to see that our recommendations are helping bring Canada in line with international standards," said Wendy Tadros, Chair of the TSB. (See the Watchlist.)

Today, Canadian pilots landing at airports conducting non-precision approaches use approach charts that depict a series of minimum altitudes to use when descending to the runway. Pilots approach the runway stepping down to each of these minimum altitudes. The Board found that these procedures could put aircraft at risk of approach and landing accidents.

TSB Recommendation A12-01 called for Transport Canada (TC) to require non-precision approach charts to show the optimum path, the stabilized constant descent angle (SCDA), pilots should use to safely descend to the runway. NAV CANADA, which is responsible for publishing approach charts, has advised that non-precision approach charts will soon depict the optimal vertical path to be flown. The Board rated the response to this recommendation as satisfactory intent (see the assessment of Recommendation A12 01).

The Board's second recommendation, A12-02, called for Transport Canada to require the use of SCDA approach techniques by Canadian operators in the conduct of non-precision instrument approach procedures. In response, TC is proposing short, medium and long-term measures to encourage Canadian operators to adopt the SCDA technique. The Board rated the response to this recommendation as satisfactory intent (see the assessment of Recommendation A12-02).

A guide to the TSB's rating system and the full text of the TSB recommendations are posted on the TSB website.


The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

For more information, contact:
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Media Relations
819-994-8053

Gatineau, Quebec, 11 February 2013 – The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) today released its investigation report (A11A0035) regarding the 16 July 2011 runway overrun of a Kelowna Flightcraft Boeing 727 cargo aircraft at St. John’s International Airport, Newfoundland and Labrador. There were no injuries to the three crew members, and damage to the aircraft was minor.

TSB investigators found that the aircraft landed at a higher than normal speed and almost 2000 feet down the runway. This meant that there was less runway distance available to stop. A combination of worn tires and a wet runway caused the aircraft to hydroplane during braking, resulting in a loss of directional control and the runway overrun.

This accident underscores why the issue of runway overruns is on the TSB Watchlist and why action is needed to prevent future occurrences. Pilots need timely reports on runway surface conditions to prepare for safe landings. When an overrun occurs, longer runway-end safety areas, or engineered systems and structures designed to stop aircraft, can prevent injuries and aircraft damage.

At the time of the accident, the runway surface-condition reporting standards did not provide clear direction for rainy conditions or wet runways. The investigation found that some employees of the airline did not understand the obligations for reporting incidents under the safety management system (SMS)—SMS is also on the TSB Watchlist. Although training was provided on SMS and reporting requirements, there was no specific guidance on what may be considered a reportable hazard. If all employees do not fully understand their reporting obligations, some safety issues go unreported, which increases the risk that those issues might not be identified and mitigated.

Since the accident, Kelowna Flightcraft has improved training for its pilots on landing distances, braking, wet and contaminated runways, and crosswind landings. The St. John’s International Airport Authority implemented an expanded runway-friction testing program to gain a better understanding of the overall condition of their runways when they are wet.


The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

For more information, contact:
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Media Relations
819-994-8053

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is deploying a team of investigators to the site of an accident involving a Cessna 210 in Waskada, Manitoba. The TSB will gather information and assess the occurrence.

The TSB is an independent agency that advances transportation safety by investigating occurrences in the marine, pipeline, rail and air modes of transportation. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

Published in Investigations

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is deploying a team of investigators to the site of an accident involving a Beechcraft Duchess aircraft 2 miles west of the Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport, Ontario. The TSB will gather information and assess the occurrence.

The TSB is an independent agency that advances transportation safety by investigating occurrences in the marine, pipeline, rail and air modes of transportation. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

Published in Investigations

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is deploying a team of investigators to the site of a helicopter accident at the Sept- Îles airport. The team will gather information and assess the occurrence.

The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability. 

Published in Investigations

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is deploying an investigator as its accredited representative to the site of an accident in Kazakhstan involving a Bombardier CRJ 200 aircraft.

Published in Investigations

TSB update: Antarctica plane accident

Gatineau, Quebec, 28 January 2013 – The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is still assessing the air accident that occurred in Antarctica, involving a de Havilland DHC 6 Twin Otter aircraft operated Kenn Borek Air Ltd. Three people were fatally injured. Our thoughts are with those who lost friends and loved ones in this accident.

The Search and Rescue team has recovered the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) from the wreckage. It is being flown to the TSB Laboratory in Ottawa.

At this time, the investigation team is gathering available information on this accident. The TSB will take the time necessary to thoroughly analyze all of this information.


The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

For more information, contact:
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Media Relations
819-994-8053

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is deploying a team of investigators to the site of yesterday's accident involving a Robinson R-44 helicopter near Fox Creek, Alberta. The TSB will gather information and assess the occurrence.

The TSB is an independent agency that advances transportation safety by investigating occurrences in the marine, pipeline, rail and air modes of transportation. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

Published in Investigations

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is assessing an accident involving a de Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft, registration C-GKBC, operated by Kenn Borek Air Ltd.

Published in Investigations
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